Australia committed to nuclear non-proliferation and science, IAEA chief visit

Nuclear Challenges and Opportunities

On Tuesday, Mr. Grossi delivered the annual John Gee Memorial Lecture. “We are at a moment – where through a strange convergence of geopolitical considerations and global phenomena such as climate change and the emergence or re-emergence

On Tuesday, Mr. Grossi delivered the annual John Gee Memorial Lecture. “We are at a moment – where, through an odd convergence of geopolitical considerations and global phenomena such as climate change and the emergence or re-emergence of pandemics – we are once again reminded of the globality of the challenges we face and how we must work together to not these things lead to a very dark place,” he said in a speech that covered the future of IAEA safeguards and global security; the work of the IAEA in the field of nuclear safety and security; the role of nuclear power in avoiding emissions that cause climate change and air pollution; and the life-saving benefits of nuclear science and technology.

On Saturday, Mr Grossi visited Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) facilities with Industry and Science Minister Ed Husick. ANSTO is a government agency that uses nuclear science and techniques in areas such as health, the environment and the nuclear fuel cycle to find solutions to challenges affecting Australians.

The IAEA Director-General was shown the multi-purpose Australian Open Pool Light Water Reactor (OPAL), used in activities related to human health and enabling research in support of environmental sustainability and innovative industry; a waste management facility under construction – ANSTO Synroc – for the immobilization of molybdenum-99 production waste; and a series of neutron scattering instruments and spectrometers used in the study of materials, particle physics, and in the reconstruction and imaging of objects. Earlier this year, ANSTO’s Dingo Tomography Station made global headlines by examining a fossil to show that a crocodile ate a dinosaur around 93 million years ago.

“This wonderful institution is an important partner of the IAEA and an excellent example of how nuclear technology can make a remarkable contribution to science and innovation, supporting Australia’s industry, advanced manufacturing and competitiveness,” Mr Grossi said. He thanked Mr. Husic for his support for IAEA initiatives, including Rays of Hope. “Nuclear science plays a key role in helping to solve many of the world’s greatest challenges. Through ANSTO, Australia is making an invaluable contribution to global research and sustainable development.”

danger of pandemics – we are reminded again of the globality of the challenges we have and how we need to work together so that these things do not lead to a very dark place,” he said in a speech that covered the future of IAEA safeguards and global security; the work of the IAEA in the field of nuclear safety and security; the role of nuclear power in avoiding emissions that cause climate change and air pollution; and the life-saving benefits of nuclear science and technology.

On Saturday, Mr Grossi visited Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) facilities with Industry and Science Minister Ed Husick. ANSTO is a government agency that uses nuclear science and techniques in areas such as health, the environment and the nuclear fuel cycle to find solutions to challenges affecting Australians.

The Director-General of the IAEA was shown the Australian Lightwater Multipurpose Open Reactor (OPAL), used in activities related to human health and enabling research in support of environmental sustainability and innovative industry, as well as a series of neutron scattering instruments and spectrometers. used in teaching materials, particle physics and for reconstructing and rendering objects. Earlier this year, ANSTO’s Dingo Tomography Station made global headlines by examining a fossil to show that a crocodile ate a dinosaur around 93 million years ago.

“This wonderful institution is an important partner of the IAEA and an excellent example of how nuclear technology can make a remarkable contribution to science and innovation, supporting Australia’s industry, advanced manufacturing and competitiveness,” Mr Grossi said. He thanked Mr. Husic for his support for IAEA initiatives, including Rays of Hope. “Nuclear science plays a key role in helping to solve many of the world’s greatest challenges. Through ANSTO, Australia is making an invaluable contribution to global research and sustainable development.”

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