Health care provides 60,000 jobs as unemployment falls to pre-pandemic levels

The health care industry added 60,100 jobs in September and the overall unemployment rate in the United States fell 0.2 percentage points, returning to pre-pandemic levels as of February 2020, according to data released by Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

The 60,100 jobs created by the health care sector in September accounted for more than one-fifth of all jobs created in the U.S. economy during that time, according to the BLS.

In the health care sector, ambulatory care saw the largest job gain, with 28,100 jobs added in September, followed by hospitals, which added 27,500 jobs.

Meanwhile, nursing and residential care facilities gained just 4,500 jobs in September, while doctor’s offices gained 10,200 jobs.

In the health care sector, ambulatory care saw the largest job gain, with 28,100 jobs added in September, followed by hospitals, which added 27,500 jobs.

Meanwhile, nursing and residential care facilities gained just 4,500 jobs in September, while doctor’s offices gained 10,200 jobs.

The demand for healthcare jobs continues to grow

Matt Wolff, director and senior healthcare analyst at a consulting firm RSM USAsaid that while the health care job numbers were a “pleasant surprise,” he noted that health care spending had increased by 10% over the past two years, meaning “[w]We still have much higher demand, we still have about 10,000 Americans eligible for Medicare every day, and we’re just now getting back to pre-pandemic employment levels.”

“We’re going to have to find new ways to use technology, automation, analytics, different clinical workflows, different ways to approach healthcare in general to meet the demand,” Wolff said. “We’re just not going to be able to hire enough doctors and enough nurses and enough administrators to solve health care problems the way we did before the pandemic. Demand is growing much faster than labor supply.”

According to Wolf, much of the challenge facing the nursing and residential care sectors is competition from other industries that have increased wages over the past few years.

“We have a lot of other employers outside of health care — retailers, food service — that pay $19 an hour and offer fringe benefits,” Wolfe said. “A lot of the aged care carers have said, ‘Well, I can go and make similar money working outside of this industry’, and for a lot of them the work is much better – they’re restocking shelves, not changing colostomy bags. “

However, hospitals and outpatient settings have not been as affected by the rising salary threshold in other industries because positions in those settings already come with higher salaries, Wolff added. Although administrative workers in these environments may be affected.

“On the administrative side, we saw that the competition is not so much in what they pay, but [if] there’s flexibility,” he said. Specifically, other industries have allowed administrative workers to work from home, Wolff said.

“Anecdotally, we’ve worked with a lot of clients and systems where, after they came out of the pandemic, they said to their IT people or their HR people or whoever, ‘Okay, now we’re going back to the office in five days week,” he said. “These functions just said no and went to work in other industries. It’s a challenge for health systems to navigate well. Many providers do it well, and many have more to learn about management of a hybrid workforce.” (Muoio, Cruel health care10/7; AHA news, 10/7; lane, The hill, 10/7; Gooch, Review of Becker’s Hospital10/7)

Leave a Comment