Healthcare card after COVID: Which states rank highest (and lowest)?

THE LONGEST 5 COUNTRIES FOR HEALTHCARE

47. Missouri

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 38

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 39

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 50

HEALTHY LIFE: 39

COVID-19: 40

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 51

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 38

(Photo: f11photo / Shutterstock.com)

48. TEXAS

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 51

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 44

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 40

HEALTHY LIFE: 27

COVID-19: 44

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 34

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 46

(Photo: SeanPavonePhoto / Adobe Stock)

49. WEST VIRGINIA

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 33

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 32

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 51

HEALTHY LIFE: 51

COVID-19: 45

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 27

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 43

(Photo: Kelly Schmidt)

50. OKLAHOMA

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 50

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 37

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 48

HEALTHY LIFE: 44

COVID-19: 50

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 47

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 42

(Photo: SeanPavonePhoto / Adobe Stock)

51. MISSISIPI

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 49

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 48

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 43

HEALTHY LIFE: 50

COVID-19: 48

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 30

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 48

(Photo: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com)

TOP 5 STATE OF HEALTHCARE

5. VERMONT

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 7

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 2

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 26

HEALTHY LIFE: 16

COVID-19: 3

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 19

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: (no result)

(Photo: Shutterstock)

4. WASHINGTON

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 10

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 14

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 7

HEALTHY LIFE: 11

COVID-19: 4

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 21

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 9

(Photo: Jakob Radlgruber – Fotolia)

3. CONNECTICUT

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 4

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 5

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 31

HEALTHY LIFE: 9

COVID-19: 10

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 5

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 5

(Photo: Shutterstock)

2. MASSACHUZETS

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 1

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 1

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 35

HEALTHY LIFE: 1

COVID-19: 8

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 2

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 1

(Photo: Tono Balaguer / Shutterstock.com)

1. HAWAII

ACCESS AND ACCESSIBILITY: 3

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT: 7

HOSPITAL USE AND COSTS: 2

HEALTHY LIFE: 2

COVID-19: 1

INCOME DIFFERENCES: 3

RACIAL AND ETHNIC EQUALITY: 3

(Photo: MNStudio / Adobe Stock)

JAMA Network survey from March 2021 leading causes of death in 2020 notes an increase in deaths from diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and accidental injury – even in the midst of COVID-19. “Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes can also reflect health care disorders that hinder early detection and management of the disease,” the study authors wrote.

The annual fund for assessing the effectiveness of the public health system of the British Community Fund agrees with this assessment. “As can be seen from the sharp decline in outpatient visits in 2020, many Americans have been forced to postpone routine health services such as examinations, screening and management of chronic care due to the blocking of COVID-19 and congested health facilities,” Scorecard said. “Premature deaths from treatable conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, which can be managed through timely, high-quality care, jumped from 83.8 to 89.8 deaths per 100,000 population between 2019 and 2020.

The Commonwealth report aims to assess the health care system in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and whether Americans receive the necessary care at the right time and without catastrophic blows to the portfolio. The report card also looks at America’s general health, the prevalence of high-risk behavior, and the chances of early death from preventable diseases.

For its 2022 report, the Commonwealth added data showing how well each country’s health system responded to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the total number of days when at least 80 percent of intensive care beds in each state were occupied. Among the 16 states that worked high-capacity intensive care units for at least 150 days between August 2020 and March 2022, Texas was the leader with 566 days at or above 80 percent. Alabama follows in 517 days. Rhode Island, Mississippi and Oklahoma were among the states with more than 300 days of high-capacity intensive care unit.

The report also reveals the devastating victims of drug overdoses during the pandemic. “After growing steadily in 2017, drug overdose deaths have leveled off by 2018-19,” the Scorecard authors write. “However, immediately after the onset of the pandemic, deaths increased as people dealt with physical isolation, interrupted addiction treatment and the supply of more lethal drugs such as fentanyl. West Virginia reported the highest rate of overdose mortality, followed by the District of Columbia and Kentucky.

For its overall ranking of health care in each state, The Commonwealth Fund uses 56 performance indicators grouped into five dimensions, including hospital use and avoidable costs, access and affordability, and healthy living, which includes behavior and risk factors for health, as well as public health funding. There were also newly added dimensions related to income inequality and racial and ethnic health justice.

See our slideshow above for the top and bottom five states for holistic healthcare and click here for the full report.

Leave a Comment