Martin Brandel for the good and bad of the GP of Monaco: the victory of Sergio Perez, the poor of Charles Leclerc and the FIA

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The best of the action from the Monaco Grand Prix

The best of the action from the Monaco Grand Prix

The good news from the Monaco Grand Prix is ​​that good people really win.

Sergio Perez remains one of the most down-to-earth and accessible people in the paddock and I am sure that many people in Formula 1 were ready to share a tear with him on the podium. Congratulations to him and Red Bull.

His last six races include two finishing fourth places, a trio of second places and a glorious victory. If he hadn’t had to give up to his teammate Max Verstappen a week earlier in Barcelona, ​​he would have been just one point ahead of the league, although it must be said that Max would probably have won at a faster speed with more fresh tires if allowed to fight.

Eleven years ago, Sergio crashed in Monaco during qualifying and missed the race due to a concussion that underscores the 32-year-old’s tenacity and sustained speed, now with 220 GPs under his right foot. These new aerodynamic cars with a ground effect from 2022 clearly correspond to his driving style.

In the joy of his victory in Monaco, did Sergio Perez accidentally reveal his future plans with Red Bull?

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In the joy of his victory in Monaco, did Sergio Perez accidentally reveal his future plans with Red Bull?

In the joy of his victory in Monaco, did Sergio Perez accidentally reveal his future plans with Red Bull?

The bad news was the confusion about the start of the race, which I thought had to take place at the right time.

The confusion in Monaco is another proof that the FIA ​​needs change

Holding a race in anticipation of the coming time is not necessary. We have virtual and real safety cars, red flags, pit stop crews that can change tires in two seconds, and two types of wet weather tires to cover these challenges. This is the goal of Formula One racing.

Several reliable sources tell me that there were heated arguments in Race Control during the impasse, as we all watched uncertainly what was happening. This probably explains the periods of inactivity and lack of information, as well as the reason why the safety car was not outside to investigate the conditions of the track, as usual.

Heavy rain in Monte Carlo imposes a red flag and further delays in the Monaco Grand Prix.

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Heavy rain in Monte Carlo imposes a red flag and further delays in the Monaco Grand Prix.

Heavy rain in Monte Carlo imposes a red flag and further delays in the Monaco Grand Prix.

The FIA, for the well-being of Formula 1, urgently needs a major and clonal change with a fully committed and authorized racing director with at least one backup, a special inspector of chains and systems, plus an authorized and efficient communications department. I consider this to be a problem of the highest priority.

What happened in the defining circumstances of last year’s championship in Abu Dhabi was ripe for months, maybe even years, after the death of Charlie Whiting, and was inevitable, given that we had 39 races, including a very hasty one. “Pop-up” events taking place during the pandemic without the necessary resources and structure in the FIA.

And what happened to Michael Massey after that turned the work into a poisonous mess, and that will require some correction, if that’s really possible. He was the right man for the job, Charlie’s backup, but honestly, the F1 and the FIA ​​waved from time to time and the whole thing veered off the track in terms of dominating competition control and refereeing, which is essential.

Rivers of water flow through the De Monaco track with the red flag of the race's tour.

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Rivers of water flow through the De Monaco track with the red flag of the race’s tour.

Rivers of water flow through the De Monaco track with the red flag of the race’s tour.

We were informed by the FIA ​​on 20.03 after the race on Sunday that there are problems with the power supply of the starting portal due to heavy rain, which explains the rolling starts after the red flags. If we were told this in the media through our simple and effective WhatsApp group, then we could inform the tens of millions of viewers around the world and the tens of thousands of fans on the side and all this would make much more sense.

During the first red flag the race seemed to start randomly on the countdown clock and with a lap showing completed, there was probably a trigger point, but then we were greeted with exceptional control of the car by drivers with zero experience in 2022 cars on the new 18 “wheels of wet and slippery Monaco.

Ferrari let Leclerc down again, Verstappen increasing his lead

Of course, there were not many overtaking, this is Monaco, but I was amazed by the skills and dedication of the pilots on a constantly changing track. At one point we had cars there with pictures, intermediate and extremely wet tires, such were the crazy conditions.

You must be sorry for the local boy Charles Leclerc, he overtook the pole position and comfortably led the race only for a strategy that would leave him in fourth place. Standing in lap 18 for intermediate, then three laps later for pictures with a confused radio message, which meant he had to wait briefly for his teammate Carlos Sainz to get his pictures in a double pit stop. Therefore, he was initially beaten by Perez in second place and then delayed until fourth from the second stop.

Sky A1's Anthony Davidson analyzes the pit stops of Red Bull and Ferrari, who lost to Charles Leclerc in the Monaco Grand Prix.

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Sky A1’s Anthony Davidson analyzes the pit stops of Red Bull and Ferrari, who lost to Charles Leclerc in the Monaco Grand Prix.

Sky A1’s Anthony Davidson analyzes the stops of Red Bull and Ferrari, which lost Charles Leclerc in the Monaco Grand Prix.

Unusually during the second red flag for the significant crash of Mick Schumacher in the pool, he no doubt managed to share his feelings about all this with the team. His race was to lose, and he didn’t even end up on the podium just to rub salt in his wounds.

The mutual admiration and affection between Leclerc and Ferrari reminds me of the relationship Michael Schumacher had with the team, but this was severely tested by Leclerc in eight days of two missed glorious victories and a wasted opportunity to regain the lead in the World Cup.

Charles Leclerc was outraged by the radio calls from his Ferrari team to join the box or not.

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Charles Leclerc was outraged by the radio calls from his Ferrari team to join the box or not.

Charles Leclerc was outraged by the radio calls from his Ferrari team to join the box or not.

Of course, we don’t hear all the radio broadcasts, but it must be said that Sainz at Ferrari was quite clear that he wanted to skip the intermediate and switch directly to slick tires, and this was a potentially smart, confident and profitable decision. Unfortunately for him, coming out of the wet pitlane in the hard pictures, he followed Williams to Latifi for a dozen turns and lost the position on the track from Perez, which provided a winning race speed of his intermediate tires between 16 and 21 laps.

Despite his hard work and best efforts to beat Perez, whose mid-range tires were above their best in the final stages, this would be another second place for Sainz. His day will come.

Max Verstappen of Red Bull and Sergio Perez were full of praise for the team for the right strategy during the Monaco Grand Prix.

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Max Verstappen of Red Bull and Sergio Perez were full of praise for the team for the right strategy during the Monaco Grand Prix.

Max Verstappen of Red Bull and Sergio Perez were full of praise for the team for the right strategy during the Monaco Grand Prix.

In third place, Max Verstappen was surprisingly pleased, probably because he had his current championship champion Leclerc behind him. Max had been missing a small portion of the weekend for some reason, and he was behind Perez in that regard. One or three for Red Bull was a very solid result for the team, given that Ferrari were obviously faster.

Hamilton’s disappointment, Ferrari’s protests and Monaco’s future

George Russell did another great drive for Mercedes to finish 5th. He finished just two-tenths ahead of McLaren’s Lando Norris, who also achieved the fastest lap with his fresh mid-tires fitted in lap 51 of what turned into a shortened and expired 64-lap race (instead of the planned 78) for the curious. an hour and fifty-six and a half minutes of racing had elapsed.

Norris had this luxury at an extra stop because behind him Fernando Alonso entered a stable but necessary tire-saving mode, with the rest of the field lined up behind him, starting with a very disappointed Lewis Hamilton. “That’s not my problem,” Fernando said, and you can’t help but feel that there is still a needle between them after their 2007 McLaren season as teammates.

Fernando then strangely took off for a while and made the third fastest lap of the race to retain 7th place.

Lewis Hamilton and Esteban Ocon gather at Sainte Devote as the Mercedes driver tries to overtake.

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Lewis Hamilton and Esteban Ocon gather at Sainte Devote as the Mercedes driver tries to overtake.

Lewis Hamilton and Esteban Ocon gather at Sainte Devote as the Mercedes driver tries to overtake.

8th was Hamilton, who would usually excel in such conditions if fresh air is considered, and 10th was Seb Vettel for Aston Martin, which means that together with Alonso only seven seconds covered the drivers with a combined 13 world championships. … but not much glory that day. Valteri Botas brought his Alfa Romeo well to 9th place to join them on the flag.

It was a day he had to forget about Schumacher, who anxiously tore his car in two for more damage repair bills for the Haas team, and I can imagine getting a full hair dryer from team boss Günther Steiner in the style of angry Ken Tyrell or Alex Ferguson.

Mick Schumacher's car split in two in a high-speed crash in the pool, which led to a red flag at the Monaco Grand Prix.

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Mick Schumacher’s car split in two in a high-speed crash in the pool, which led to a red flag at the Monaco Grand Prix.

Mick Schumacher’s car split in two in a high-speed crash in the pool, which led to a red flag at the Monaco Grand Prix.

It was another weekend we had to forget about Daniel Ricciardo, a famous expert from Monaco who just can’t find his fashion at McLaren and the tension and frustration there is now going public.

Ferrari protested both Red Bull drivers after the race to cross the dividing line, but despite the semantics and potential conflict of wording of the various regulatory documents, it was decided that Perez did not cross the line at all and that Verstappen ran the line. did not cross it completely with a single wheel, and according to the regulations of 2022, this was acceptable.

I know that many fans find Monaco too disappointing on the day of the race with the lack of overtaking and wheel-to-wheel action, but in the round of the World Cup, which takes place on a wide variety of tracks and venues, I hope Monaco and Formula 1 can find a way to make a new deal for 2023 and after that, these are always unique and sometimes completely crazy three days there.

If this is an opposition, I don’t think Liberty Media F1 owners will blink first and already have other “crown jewels”.

MB

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