New report highlights importance of health insurance status and cancer stage at diagnosis and survival – InsuranceNewsNet

ATLANTA, Georgia, July 14 (TNSjou) — The American Cancer Society issued the following news release on July 13, 2022:

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American Cancer Society researchers highlight need for better access to health insurance coverage to improve cancer care and outcomes

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A new report led by researchers from American Cancer Society (ACS) shows that people without health insurance coverage are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage cancer and have worse survival rates after a cancer diagnosis than those with private health insurance. The study also showed that for six types of cancer — prostate, colorectal, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, oral cavity, liver and esophagus — uninsured individuals diagnosed with stage I disease had worse survival rates than those with private health insurance , diagnosed with stage II disease. The findings were published today in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

“Our findings extend earlier research showing that lack of health insurance coverage is associated with a later stage at diagnosis and poorer short-term survival among individuals newly diagnosed with cancer, with newer data and more information on long-term survival.” , he said Jinxuan Zhaosenior research associate in American Cancer Society and lead author of the study. “Improving access to comprehensive health insurance coverage is critical to ensuring access to care across the cancer care continuum, including receiving recommended cancer screening, timely diagnosis and quality treatment.”

The researchers used data from US National Cancer Database (NCDB), a nationwide, hospital-based cancer registry jointly sponsored by the ACS and American College of Surgeons. The NCDB includes about 70% of all newly diagnosed cancer cases in US from more than 1,500 facilities accredited by American College of Surgeons Cancer Commission. The NCDB contains patient information on demographics, tumor characteristics, health insurance, and vital status. The study authors included individuals aged 18-64 years newly diagnosed with cancer between 2010 to 2013, with any of 19 common invasive cancers.

The analysis showed that people without health insurance coverage were more likely to have a cancer diagnosis at a later stage than people with private health insurance coverage. In addition, people without health insurance coverage are more likely to have worse short- and long-term survival rates after a cancer diagnosis than people with private health insurance coverage.

Compared with privately insured individuals diagnosed with stage II cancer, uninsured individuals diagnosed with stage I cancer had worse survival rates for 6 cancer sites—prostate, colorectal, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, oral cavity, liver, and esophagus. In multivariate analyses, individuals without health insurance had worse survival than their privately insured counterparts at every stage for all 19 cancers combined and for 14 of 19 cancer sites.

“Our study adds to the growing body of evidence showing that access to comprehensive health insurance coverage is critical to improving cancer care and outcomes,” said Dr. William Dahutchief research associate at American Cancer Society. “People shouldn’t have to suffer worse survival rates or a later diagnosis because they can’t afford treatment.”

dr Robin Yabroff is the senior author of the study. Other ACS authors include: Drs. Suesong Handr Leticia Nogueiraand others. Ahmed Jemal.

Resources from American Cancer Society about health insurance coverage can be found here (https://www.cancer.org/treatment/finding-and-paying-for-treatment/understanding-health-insurance.html).

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DIRECTORY: CA – A Cancer Journal for Clinicians https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21732

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Original text here: http://pressroom.cancer.org/releases?item=1123

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