New technology allows Volusia County 911 callers to share videos

The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office is using a new technology in its communications center that will be able to give law enforcement officials a clear picture of what is happening before they arrive at the scene. It’s called Carbyne, and it allows 911 callers to share video from a cell phone in real time. “The more information we have, the better we can get the job done,” said Glenn Lopez. Lopez is assistant communications director at the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office. He says that when 911 callers are in trouble or witness it, their information is crucial. For example, on Thursday, many called for a reckless Interstate 4 driver accused of drunk driving. Now 911 callers can actually share a video of what’s happening in real time through Carbyne. Lopez gave a good demonstration on WESH 2 News. “Our dispatchers can send them a link on their phone to open and then show us photos or videos of what they see,” Lopez said. Dispatchers can then share the video live via the CAD system with first aid staff. The system just launched on Wednesday and they are still fixing the problems, but you can already see that this is an amazing development when it comes to getting this immediate emergency information. “It also shows the location of the map,” Lopez said. The new technology also shows more accurate caller location data: “If someone doesn’t know exactly where they are and we have a lot of tourist activity in the county, we get very accurate location information,” Lopez said. Officials are most excited about using the system during ongoing crimes such as active shootings, hostage situations and incidents of domestic violence. “If someone was barricaded and someone was in the house with them, they could give us a video of what’s going on,” Lopez said. 911 callers must agree to share a video. The link is not sent with every call, but if the criteria require it and the person says yes, there can be a huge difference in law enforcement. The video calling feature does not provide a law for enforcing any access to the contents or settings of the caller’s phone in real time or at a later date.

The sheriff of Volusia County is using a new technology in his communications center that will be able to give law enforcement officials a clear picture of what is happening before they arrive.

It’s called Carbyne and allows 911 callers to share real-time video from a cell phone.

“The more information we have, the better we can get the job done,” said Glenn Lopez.

Lopez is assistant communications director at the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office.

He says that when 911 callers are in trouble or witness it, their information is crucial.

For example, on Thursday, many called for a reckless Interstate 4 driver accused of drunk driving.

Now 911 callers can actually share a video of what’s happening in real time through Carbyne.

Lopez gave a good demonstration on WESH 2 News.

“Our dispatchers can send them a link on their phone to open and then show us photos or videos of what they see,” Lopez said.

Dispatchers can then share the video live via the CAD system with first aid staff.

The system just launched on Wednesday and they are still fixing the problems, but you can already see that it’s been an amazing evolution when it comes to getting this immediate emergency information.

“It also shows the location of the map,” Lopez said.

The new technology also shows more accurate caller location data.

“If someone doesn’t know exactly where they are and we have a lot of tourist activity in this county, we get very accurate information about the location,” Lopez said.

Officials are most excited about using the system during ongoing crimes such as active shootings, hostage situations and incidents of domestic violence.

“If someone was barricaded and someone was in the house with them, they could give us a video of what’s going on,” Lopez said.

911 callers must agree to share a video.

The link is not sent with every call, but if the criteria require it and the person says yes, it can make a huge difference to law enforcement.

The video calling feature does not give law enforcement any access to the content or settings of the caller’s phone in real time or at a later date.

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