Nick Kyrgios admits that he spat in the direction of an offended fan during the victory in the first round of Wimbledon and raises the question of the line judge of the “old man” | Tennis news

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Jackie Beltrao says Nick Kyrgios admitted to spitting at an offended fan during his first round of Wimbledon and questioned the line judge, whom he described as an “old man”.

Jackie Beltrao says Nick Kyrgios admitted to spitting at an offended fan during his first round of Wimbledon and questioned the line judge, whom he described as an “old man”.

Nick Kyrgios admitted that he spat in the direction of an offended fan while giving an explosive press conference after Tuesday’s match.

Kyrgios criticized the insulting Wimbledon fans and questioned the age of the line judges after reaching the second round with a 3-6 6-1 7-5 6-7 (3-7) 7-5 victory over British number 8 Paul Jubb .

In response to a question from a reporter who asked, “In the end, you seem to be spitting in the direction of …” Kirios replied, “To one of the people who doesn’t respect me, yes. I wouldn’t do that to someone who supported me. “

He added: “I’ve been dealing with hatred and negativity for a long time, so I don’t feel I owe anything to this person.

“He literally came to the match not to really support anyone, just to cause disrespect. That’s fine, but if I give it back to you, that’s right.”

Kyrgios said he was not racially abused during the match, but continued to criticize the general public and the influence of social media to promote “negativity”.

“There was a lot of disrespect today,” Kyrgios said. “And I’m just starting to think it’s normal – when it’s really not.

“I didn’t say anything to the crowd until they started – every time I went down to the far end – I just left. I don’t know if it’s normal or not.”

Australian World No. 40 added: “I love this tournament. It has nothing to do with Wimbledon; just think it’s just a whole generation of people on social media who feel they have the right to comment on anything with negativity Just keep going in real life.

“There’s a fence there and I can’t physically do anything or say anything because I’m going to have problems, so they just feel like they can just say whatever they want.

Kyrgios also spoke of his disappointment at the fiery exchange with the line judge during the match, as the 27-year-old footballer stood behind his criticism of the “old man”.

“I said most referees are older and I just don’t think that’s ideal when you play sports with such small margins,” Kyrgios said.

“In fact, people who are younger have better eyesight. Don’t you think that’s appropriate?

“When you play sports for hundreds and thousands of dollars, don’t you think we should have people who are really ready to call the ball or out?”

“This specific thing: I hit a ball, the old man called it. He was inside. Probably, if the man was 40, he might not have called it. In that case, he got the call wrong. “

British number eight Paul Jubb pushed Nick Kyrgios all the way in his first round match, leading him to five sets

British number eight Paul Jubb pushed Nick Kyrgios all the way in his first round match, leading him to five sets

Kyrgios sent 30 aces and made 55 unforced errors in his stubborn victory, with 22-year-old Jubb pushing him to five sets.

Earlier, in an interview on the court, Kyrgios paid tribute to the British youth, while mentioning his disappointment with the audience.

“Incredibly difficult,” he said. “Obviously he is a local wild card, he had nothing to lose, he played the moment and played exceptional tennis.

“(The crowd) was quite boisterous today, a few people in the crowd didn’t shy away from criticizing me. This one was for you. You know who you are.”

What Kyrgios said at an explosive press conference

Reporter: I’m sorry I got off the tennis court. Quite a serious question. Were you racially abused in court?

NK: Not today, no, no. But today a lot of disrespect was thrown from the crowds. I’m just starting to think it’s normal when it really isn’t. You know, I didn’t say anything to the crowd until they started every time I went down to the far end, people just left. I just don’t know if it’s normal or not.

Reporter: How does it make you feel when you feel it? Lots of people like you here. Is this something new that you are discovering?

NK: It just happened, like obviously when it happened in Stuttgart, racial violence, and then it happened to (Naomi) Osaka in Indian Wells, where someone screamed, it affected her game. I just don’t understand why viewers think they can do this.

Reporter: Can you share with us the details of what you were told?

NL: Just pure disrespect, everything. It was as if someone had just screamed, I was nasty in the crowd today. Is this normal? No. But I just don’t understand why this happens again and again.

Reporter: You usually love this tournament …

NK: No, I love this tournament. It has nothing to do with Wimbledon. I just think it’s a whole generation of people on social media who feel like they have the right to comment on anything with negativity. It just goes on in real life.

Because there is a fence there, and I can’t physically do anything or say anything, because I will have problems. They just feel the need to be able to say whatever they want.

Reporter: On the other hand, you were wiretapped today, you had little interaction with the line judges. At one point, I think you said, “You’re in your 90s, you can’t see the ball.”

NK: No, I said that most referees are older and I just don’t think that’s ideal when you play sports with such small margins. In fact, people who are younger have better eyesight. Don’t you think that’s appropriate?

When you play sports for hundreds and thousands of dollars, don’t you think we should have people who are really ready to call the ball or out?

Reporter: But is it a matter of age?

NK: Does anyone actually have better eyesight when they are younger?

Reporter: Not necessarily.

NK: What do you mean by “optional” (laughs)? what does he mean What do you mean “optional”?

Reporter: I do not know.

NK: This particular thing, I hit a ball, the old man called it, it was inside. So it can be said that if the person was 40, he may not have called it.

Reporter: But he may be 60 and he may have 20/20 vision, you don’t know that.

NK: In this case, he got the call wrong.

Reporter: Young people get the wrong call, right?

NK: All right. I do not understand the question, however.

Reporter: Can you tell us more about all the work with social media? Do other players share your fears? What would you like Wimbledon to do about it?

NK: I didn’t say that about anyone … I’m just giving you an example. I think people, viewers, everyone is so quick to put their energy negatively on someone else. And there are no real consequences.

On social media, you can just kill someone on social media and there are no real consequences. Now, whether it’s racial violence or just disrespect, that’s acceptable. But why is this acceptable?

Reporter: If it’s two or three times, should they say …

NK: I don’t know. As a player who is very difficult, I get it almost every game. I’m playing someone who is – just because they’re sitting there and there’s nothing I can do, they just feel the need.

Reporter: Has any authority taken a fan in any of your matches?

NK: Yes, several times.

Reporter: Do you have sympathy for what is happening with line judges, for example? Do you sympathize with how players treat them, for example? The judges take it, the line judges take it.

NK: It’s deeper than that, because if I lose a tennis match and it comes down to a call, they won’t be abused on social media. I have to deal with that. My girlfriend is dealing with hate messages. My family deals with hate messages. I deal with messages of hatred.

Where, for example, that time in Miami, when Carlos Bernardes did that and the whole game turned around. Did you deal with the consequences? I’m still working on it. They just keep going, as if nothing happened. They go back there and judge, judge.

To me, hate messages carry much more weight than that. This is what people do not understand. Not just, Oh, he made a bad call, and I’m just abusing the judge. I’m disappointed.

If I lose this match, you have no idea how many abuses I have to go through, where the referees don’t go through anything. what do they go through?

Reporter: Do you have sympathy for them, however?

NK: Yes, if I hit 220 service and he hits it, oh, sorry. Are you okay? If they make a bad call, I focus only on one line, why should I feel sympathy for that? There are hundreds of thousands of dollars on the line. Why should I sympathize with this? There’s no point.

Reporter: Can I just ask, in the end you seem to be spitting in the direction of …

NK: To one of the people who doesn’t respect me. Yes.

Reporter: So this was intentional?

NK: Yes. I would not do that to someone who supports me.

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