Ramble More Design uses centuries-old techniques to create modern art

Maine’s Ramble More Design uses centuries-old techniques to create modern art



Maine ,, STEVE MINICH TAKES US INTO A PORTLAND STUDIO OF ‘RAMBLE MORE DESIGN’ …. — (23-28-23) NATS OF ROLLING UP — (23-39-26) “I think you’re HAPPY HOPES THAT PEOPLE REALLY CARE ABOUT THE PROCESS IN WHICH I WORK. ” “He has stood up the use of antique photographs for the transfotography of anti-cycle photographers-in much larger works of art … (23-37-12)” What I really love is to take these old archival images, I scan I scan , DIGITALIZE I SHOULD EXPORT THEM IN THE FUTURE-BUTT-73 -23) I SHOULD EXPRESS THEM IN NEGATIVES AND AGAIN USE ANALOGUE OR ARCHIVE ARCHIVE ” -LITTLE NATS- GOLDKIN USES A “COUPLE” OF ANALOGUES MEDIATORS ,,, BOTH DATES FROM CENTURIES ….. TO CREATE ITS LINE FROM “BLUE” IMPRESSIONS – THIS IS IN PROTECTION ,, –NATS OF PASTING– THE OTHER IS ‘WHEAT PASTING’ ,,,,, HOME PREPARATION OF ADHESIVE MADE WITH FLOUR — IN ADDITION ,, INTENDED ,,, MORE THAN MORE SWITCH OFF — (22-56-00) “AND IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO MAKE THE PERFECT.” ONE OF HIS WALLS WITH WHEAT PASTE HANGES INSIDE A TANK FOR THE SHOPPING CENTER IN PORTLAND CENTER ,,, HE INDICATES THE MANY WRINKLES AND BUBBLES – ALL OF THEM-55. Only the blame on the wall, when you darken it, you can see every moment, every moment you see the hand of things, you can tell a human being who did it …. “all works with a common theme – look – look IN AMERICA YEARS AGO – IN THE DAYS BEFORE COMPUTERS AND SMARTPHONES — PEOPLE TO HAVE FUN ,,,,,, (23-34-48) “THAT’S HOW I FIND THESE OLDER PHOTOGRAPHERS THE SCREENS, THEY SHOW HOW PEOPLE WORKED, HOW PEOPLE PLAYED. ” –NATS — GOLDKIN FIRST UNDERSTANDS WHY THE PIECE IS ORDINARY, THE ONE THAT CATCHES THE EYE …. BUT TO CARE ABOUT THE PROCESS, HE SAYS, IS TO RECOGNIZE WHY I WATCH IT AND I WATCH IT. 23-34-56) “I THINK THERE ARE MANY THAT WE CAN LOSE IN THIS DIGITAL ERA AND I WOULD TRY TO RETURN A LOT OF THIS AND INSPIRE PEOPLE TO FIND IT.” IT HAS COME FROM MANY YEARS, WHICH IS LIKE JUST DESCRIBED VAGABON – TRAVELING T

Maine’s Ramble More Design uses centuries-old techniques to create modern art

“I think my biggest hope is that people are really interested in the process I’m working on,” Timothy Goldkin told WMTW. For Goldkin, this process is as important as the finished work. Along with the use of little digital technology, Goldkin has mastered the use of outdated photographic printing to transform decades of smaller negatives into much larger works of art. “What I really like is comparing these old archival images, scanning them, digitizing them, then transferring them to the future – then reproducing them in negatives and using analog or archival media again to take them back to the past. Said Goldkin. Goldkin used a pair of analog media, both dating back centuries, to create his line of prints. One is a process called a cyanotype that uses UV light. The other process he uses is wheat pasteurization. Goldkin uses a homemade mixture of glue made with flour, although he deliberately uses more paste, which makes more flaws or imperfections in pieces. One of his murals of wheat paste hangs in a brain research center in Portland. He says that the many flaws, wrinkles and bubbles remind us that the work is art. “Instead of just a piece of vinyl on the wall, when you get close to it, you can see at any moment, every moment you see someone’s hand, you can tell a human being has made it,” Goldkin said. Whether it’s wheat gluing or cyanotype, all of Goldkin’s works have a common theme: A look at America years ago, days before computers and smartphone screens. “I find that these older photos show people before screens existed, they show how people worked, how people played,” Goldkin said. “I think there are a lot of things we can lose in this digital age, and I would like to try to give back as much as I can and inspire people to find inspiration in that.”

“I think my biggest hope is that people are really interested in the process I’m working on,” Timothy Goldkin told WMTW.

For Goldkin, this process is as important as the finished piece.

Along with the use of little digital technology, Goldkin has mastered the use of outdated photographic printing to transform decades of smaller negatives into much larger works of art.

“What I really like is comparing these old archival images, scanning them, digitizing them, then transferring them to the future – then reproducing them in negatives and using analog or archival media again to take them back to the past. , ”Goldkin said.

Goldkin used a pair of analog media, both dating back centuries, to create his line of prints. One is a process called a cyanotype that uses UV light.

The other process he uses is wheat pasteurization. Goldkin uses a homemade mixture of glue made with flour, although he deliberately uses more paste, which makes more flaws or imperfections in pieces.

One of his murals of wheat paste hangs in a brain research center in Portland. He says that the many flaws, wrinkles and bubbles remind us that the work is art.

“Instead of just a piece of vinyl on the wall, when you get close to it, you can see at any moment, every moment you see someone’s hand, you can tell a human being has made it,” Goldkin said.

Whether it’s wheat gluing or cyanotype, all of Goldkin’s works have a common theme: A look at America years ago, days before computers and smartphone screens.

“I find that these older photos show people before screens existed, they show how people worked, how people played,” Goldkin said. “I think there are a lot of things we can lose in this digital age, and I would like to try to give back as much as I can and inspire people to find inspiration in that.”

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