Something for the weekend: Only science can cheer us up

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been a little down this week. It’s the end of summer, we’re all post vacation, and everything in the news is bad, if not apocalyptic.

So when david, our star researcher, suggested trying to cheer everyone up by reminding them of all the breakthroughs we’ve made this year in science was a no-brainer. Custom article. And he really cheered us up with this list of five world-changing accomplishments.

We know our main website readers loved it – they left kind comments below like this one:

But we don’t have comments here on FT Edit, and although we can see which articles are popular, we’d like to know more about you, dear reader.

It’s been five months since we released this app to the world — and in that time we’ve curated almost 1,000 of the best FT articles for you (and read many hundreds more), had 40,000 app downloads and launched a US Edition (readers in America , if you haven’t already, update your app to get it).

But there’s still a lot we want to do, and there are some big questions we’re wrestling with: Are we a news app or something different? How should we select the stories? What else can we offer? How can we improve your experience?

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Our favorite pieces

• Have I ever seen someone wear a watch on each hand? Of course I have. Did I know this was a trend? Not until I read this week’s article about the so called “double wrist”. As soon as I read it, it made sense. Of course, if you have an Apple Watch and Rolex you will want to wear them both. But I wasn’t prepared for the long list of dual-wrist celebrities long before smartwatches came along. Apparently, everyone from Chris Pratt to Princess Diana does.
Malcolm Moore (@malcolmmoore)
Editor, FT Edit

• I love a good obituary and Quentin Peele’s portrait of Mikhail Gorbachev was an example of that genre. That was especially impressive given the speed with which he turned around Tuesday night when news of his death broke. Newspapers maintain ready-made obituary folders for public figures, but these still require a lot of work before publication – many of them have not been updated for years. But it was a masterclass: wide in scope, nuanced in tone, and full of all the colorful details that make life.
Hannah Rock
Deputy Editor, FT Edit (@HannahRockFT)

Our favorite fact of the week…

The Beatles wanted to adapt the Lord of the Rings books into a film. They were taken down by the author of the books, J. RR Tolkien. Others, including Walt Disney and George Lucas, are just some of the adaptations that never got off the ground. from The Lord of the Rings – Why filmmakers can’t resist Tolkien’s fantasy world

Something to listen to

Paine’s politics — Next week we should have the results of the Tory leadership election, which will determine who will be the next Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The FT’s politics podcast looks at what the leader Liz Truss’s financial policy could look like.

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Technical tonic — In episode three of Tech Tonic, Jemima Kelly dives into NFTs and asks if they’re actually a good thing that can help artists, or just an excuse for the scams that are going around.

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Behind the money — Many eyes are on a German lawsuit filed by a Peruvian farmer that could make polluting companies pay for the worst effects of climate change. Behind the money unpacks the details.

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Something to watch

This week we looked at how China’s efforts to spy on the West are growing at an alarming rate. But spying on Beijing is only one facet of a global influence operation, with the South Pacific as one of the main theaters.

Our global China editor James Kinge outlines China’s goals in the region with John Lee, a fellow at the Hudson Institute and former national security adviser to the Australian government.

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