The 911 can find you faster with this new technology

When you call 911, minutes are what separate you or someone you love from life or death in a serious emergency. Data shows that 80% of calls to 911 come from a mobile device, but dispatch centers may struggle to find them. The new technology now shortens the response time of the 911 by locating the caller. AT&T has partnered with Intrado to introduce a new feature called Locate Before Route. It automatically transmits 911 wireless calls to the relevant control centers on a national basis. Calls are now diverted faster and more accurately. See the story above: See the new technology in action with our chief national consumer correspondent Jeff Rosen. Typically, when someone calls 911, the call pings from a cell phone tower and is routed to a control center based on the location of the tower. But whatever tower is hit is only a starting point for 911. This is not the exact location. Now the cell phone tower is almost taken out as an intermediary. The caller’s phone and GPS provide an accurate location. JR Luna is vice president and general manager for the state of Florida at AT&T. “Before this technology, we used cellular sites that could be within a 10-mile radius of your call. This really allows first aid people to know within 50 yards where an emergency could happen, “Luna said. That’s right, the location of 911 calls will shrink from 10 miles to 50 yards. That’s half the football playground! “This will shave seconds! turn off emergency calls and this will be important for emergency responders to get to emergencies faster, “Luna said. Dan Koenig is senior manager for 911 Program Services for the Palm Beach County Department of Public Safety. Koenig said the technology “Cell phone towers can be a few miles away. So your call can go to other jurisdictions,” Koenig said, meaning that when someone calls 911, they can “He can go to a nearby town. The receiver will have to go and question the person, which will take some time, and then he will have to transfer the call,” he said. Koenig: “When you dial 911, you’re already in some kind of disaster. That way we can help the caller and make it easier.” Just like apps that use GPS to find and locate users, it’s all about the 911. “When 911 was first developed, it was before we had smartphones.” Intrado Vice President of Technology John Snape said: “The challenge was that 911 is not an application on your phone that works. The phone has it, but we couldn’t get it off the phone … Now it’s using just that location. We can take this location out of your phone and use it. And also use the other location we had before, which is where the network will ask the phone for the location. ” Snapp said the 911 gets the best of all worlds now thanks to this technology. Situations where this will really help save lives: The caller gets into an accident or an emergency, but does not know their location. A child calls 911 but does not know their address. The caller on 911 cannot speak. The caller is at a place where another dispatcher can pick up the call, not a closer one. AT&T users don’t have to do anything to get the feature. There is no flip switch or touch button. This is automatic, no matter what type of phone you have. Verizon said it also uses an emergency server platform that allows Verizon to locate a device and route the call to the most effective public safety response point. T-Mobile says it is launching location-based routing and working with public safety response points to implement it.

When you call 911, minutes are what separate you or someone you love from life or death in a serious emergency.

Data shows that 80% of calls to 911 come from a mobile device, but dispatch centers may struggle to find them. The new technology now shortens the response time of the 911 by pinpointing the caller’s location.

AT&T has partnered with Intrado to introduce a new feature called Locate Before Route. It automatically transmits 911 wireless calls to the relevant control centers on a national basis. Calls are now diverted faster and more accurately.

See the story above: See the new technology in action with our chief national consumer correspondent Jeff Rosen.

Typically, when someone calls 911, the call pings from the tower to a cell phone and is routed to a control center based on the location of the tower. But whatever tower is hit is only a starting point for 911. This is not the exact location.

Now the cell phone tower is almost taken out as an intermediary. The caller’s phone and GPS provide an accurate location.

JR Luna is vice president and general manager for the state of Florida at AT&T.

“Before this technology, we used cellular sites that could be within a 10-mile radius of your call. “It really allows first aid people to know within 50 yards where an emergency could happen,” Luna said.

That’s right, the location of 911 calls will shrink from 10 miles to 50 yards. This is half of a football field!

“This will shorten the seconds of emergency calls and it will be important for emergency people to get to emergencies faster,” Luna said.

Dan Koenig is Senior Manager for 911 Program Services for the Palm Beach County Department of Public Safety. Koenig said the technology would play a huge role in saving lives.

“Mobile phone towers can be a few miles away. So your call can go to other jurisdictions, “Koenig said.

This means that when someone calls 911, they can go to another county based on the location of the tower that received the call.

“He can go to the next town. The recipient will have to go over and question the person, which will take some time and then he will have to transfer the call, “Koenig said. “When you dial 911, you’re already in some kind of disaster. In this way we can help the caller and make it easier for him. “

Just like apps that use GPS to find and locate users, it’s all about the 911.

“When the 911 was first developed, it was before we had smartphones,” said John Snape, vice president of technology at Intrado. “The challenge was that 911 is not an application on your phone that works. The phone has it, but we couldn’t get it off the phone … Now it’s using that exact location. We may remove this location from your phone and use it. And also use the other location we had before, which is where the network will ask the phone for the location. ”

Snapp said the 911 gets the best of all worlds now thanks to this technology.

Situations where this will really help save lives:

  • The caller gets into an accident or an emergency, but does not know his location
  • A child calls 911 but does not know his address.
  • The caller on 911 cannot speak
  • The caller is at a place where another dispatcher can pick up the call, not a closer one.

AT&T users don’t have to do anything to get the feature. There is no rotate switch or touch button. This is automatic, no matter what type of phone you have.

Verizon said it also uses an emergency server platform that allows Verizon to locate a device and route the call to the most effective answer point in public safety. T-Mobile says it is launching location-based routing and working with public safety response points to implement it.

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